[VIDEO] Professional Development Events for Teachers in the Coral Gables Museum in Miami

What can we learn from the Tamiami Trail?

Social Science and Environmental Science Teachers attending both of these essions will receive 5 master plan points. Teachers can click here to register: mylearningplan.com.

Session I. Curator’s Tour “Trailblazers: The Perilous Story of the Tamiami Trail”
Sunday, October 11, 2015
1:00 p.m.

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CORAL GABLES SCHOOL TOURS The Coral Gables Museum’s 2015 – 2016 season will offer a variety of exciting, educational field trips and activities for K – 12 students. Our educational programs introduce students to career paths in the civic arts such as architect, landscape architect, developer, urban planner, engineer, ecologist, activist, politician, public administrator and more. To learn more call 305.603.8067 / email education@coralgablesmuseum.org.

First event is featuring a guided tour of “Trailblazers: The Perilous Story of the Tamiami Trail” by guest curator Jon Ullman. Jonathan Ullman has been building coalitions and organizing activists to restore the Everglades for the Sierra Club for 17 years. He organized a broad-based coalition to build the River of Grass Parkway, a 6.5-mile collection of bridges across Tamiami Trail to restore water flow to Everglades National Park and Florida Bay. His advocacy on the campaign to raise US-41 helped result in the first raised mile and an additional planned 5.5 mile of bridging. Teacher resources will be provided to support classroom learning and field experiences.

Regular Museum admission applies.
$7 adults; $5 students and seniors; Free for Museum members.


Session II. Panel Discussion “Raising the Road” moderated by Jon Ullman at the Coral Gables Museum

Thursday, February 18, 2016
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

This panel discussion moderated by guest curator and environmental activist Jon Ullman, will feature scientists, engineers, and representatives from the Everglades National Park. The group will discuss the efforts to raise portions of the Tamiami Trail at the Shark River Slough, where water moves into the southern section of Everglades National Park. This will immediately result in increased water flow and restoration of the natural habitat. Long-term benefits include combating sea-level rise. Experts will expand upon these topics.

Regular Museum admission applies.
$7 adults; $5 students and seniors; Free for Museum members




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